Blog a Koran

 

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Today we remember the tragedy that occurred nine years ago.  We remember those who lost loved ones that day.  We remember those who sacrificed their lives to save others.  I’m still reminded of the pictures of firefighters going up the stairs while others were fleeing down.

In light of the events with the proposed mosque near Ground Zero and the pastor down in Florida, this day has unfortunately become very politicized.  Today I am joining with other followers of Christ around the world in blogging a verse from the Koran to create respect between two major world religions.  Find a full list of other bloggers here.

The verse I want to discuss briefly from the Koran is found in 4:36.

Sahih International

Worship Allah and associate nothing with Him, and to parents do good, and to relatives, orphans, the needy, the near neighbor, the neighbor farther away, the companion at your side, the traveler, and those whom your right hands possess. Indeed, Allah does not like those who are self-deluding and boastful.

This comes from a section of the Koran that deals with the rights of women.  This verse makes a connection between worshipping Allah and loving people.  Sounds familiar to Christians as Jesus drew the same connection from the Hebrew Scriptures.  Loving God and loving people cannot be separated.  One cannot love God and not love others.  If you don’t love others, then you don’t love God.  This verse from the Koran calls believers to worship Allah by loving one’s neighbor and even the neighbor farther away.  It even points out to do good to the traveler who is just passing through.  Then it ends by saying that Allah does not like those who are boastful and arrogant.  Humility is honored.

On this day that some want to divide based on religion, may we truly love our neighbor regardless of their religious beliefs, whether they are Muslim, Christian, Jew or don’t have any religious beliefs.

About joelnewton

I am a husband to Hillary, a father to Anna and Norah

Posted on September 11, 2010, in Church and Culture and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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